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  1. Fifty State Survey of Adult Sex Offender Registration Requirements, Brenda V. Smith, American University, Washington College of Law, NIC/WCL Project on Addressing Prison Rape (2009)

    This extremely useful publication is part of a larger scholarly project on addressing prison rape by American University-Washington College of Law Professor Brenda V. Smith; it is one in a series that aims to create a “legal toolkit” for addressing sexual ...

    admin - 12/3/2017 10:44am

  2. Created Equal: Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the US Criminal Justice System, Christopher Hartney, Linh Vuong, National Council On Crime And Delinquency (2009)

    Using available national data, the authors compare rates of arrest, incarceration, probation, sentencing length and other criminal justice contacts of people of color as compared to Whites. Despite popular perceptions that racism in the criminal justice sy ...

    admin - 12/3/2017 11:25am

  3. Criminalization of HIV Transmission: Poor Public Health Policy, Edwin Cameron, HIV/AIDS Policy and Law Review (2009)

    This article, taken from a speech by Justice Edwin Cameron of the Constitutional Court of South Africa, discusses the ineffective nature of HIV criminalization laws and analyzes some of the negative effects that they cause. Justice Cameron breaks down his ...

    Anonymous (not verified) - 6/28/2017 2:13pm

  4. Living With HIV, Global Network of People Living With HIV (GNP+) (2010)

    This document from the Global Network of People Living With HIV (GNP+) is designed to give an overview of the impact of the HIV epidemic from the perspective of HIV positive individuals. It analyses various factors that had an effect—either positive or ne ...

    Anonymous (not verified) - 6/28/2017 2:18pm

  5. HIV Non-Disclosure and the Criminal Law: Establishing Policy Options for Ontario, Eric Mykhalovskiy, Ph.D. et al., Ontario HIV Treatment Network (2010)

     This report was written in response to the growing concerns over the use of criminal law to address the risk of sexual transmission of HIV or AIDS in Ontario, Canada. Working from interviews and surveys with many different stakeholders, the report analyz ...

    Anonymous (not verified) - 8/9/2017 2:09pm

  6. Where HIV is a Crime, Not Just a Virus, Edwin J. Bernard, HIV Treatment Update (2010)

    This article discusses the global trend in the creation of laws specifically aimed at criminalizing HIV exposure. At the time of the article, 63 countries had at least one jurisdiction with HIV-specific criminal laws—a number on the rise, particularly in ...

    Anonymous (not verified) - 8/16/2017 11:00am

  7. How Reliable is an Undetected Viral Load?, C. Combescure et. al., HIV Medicine (2009)

    A study by the Swiss Federal AIDS Commission on patients who were treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) concluded in 2009 that individuals with a stable, low viral load for at least six months were extremely unlikely to transmit HIV. I ...

    Anonymous (not verified) - 12/3/2017 11:34am

  8. Sex Work, Criminalization, and HIV: Lessons from Advocacy History, Anna Forbes, BETA (2010)

    Sex workers are frequently omitted from discussions about the links between criminalization, marginalization, and increased HIV transmission. At the IAS 2010 conference in Vienna, substantial attention was focused on the negative impacts that criminalizat ...

    Anonymous (not verified) - 6/14/2017 11:19am

  9. Heterosexual risk of HIV-1 infection per sexual-act: systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies, Marie-Claude Boily et al., The Lancet (2009)

    This study follows up on an earlier study by the same authors examining per-act heterosexual HIV transmission probabilities. It is a systematic review and analysis of all available study data related to the likelihood of heterosexual HIV transmission. The ...

    Anonymous (not verified) - 8/16/2017 11:20am

  10. 10 Reasons Why Criminalization of HIV Exposure or Transmission Harms Women, Athena Network (2009)

    The authors conclude that HIV criminalization leads to negative public health outcomes, increased gender-based violence, and greater social and political inequalities for women. Because women are more likely to be the first to know their HIV status due to ...

    Anonymous (not verified) - 12/3/2017 11:43am

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